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NIH Trial

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A New Model to Reach Vulnerable Older Adults With Pain Self-Management Support

Study Description: Brief Summary: Learning chronic pain self-management skills can help patients improve daily functioning and quality of life, while avoiding risks associated with opioids and other pharmacological treatments. Community health workers (CHWs) may help make chronic pain self-management interventions more accessible to older adults living in underserved communities. The goal of this study is to conduct a feasibility test of a chronic pain self-management intervention delivered by CHWs, in conjunction with mobile health tools, in a sample of 10 older adults recruited from community sites in Detroit, Michigan.

Multidisciplinary Translational Approach to Investigate Mechanisms Predictors & Prevention of Persistent PTH

Study Description: Brief Summary: This is a United States Department of Defense funded Focused Program study that aims to identify mechanisms and predictors for persistent of post-traumatic headache attributed to mild traumatic brain injury, and identify methods of preventing post-traumatic headache persistence. The objective of the clinical trial component of the Focused Program is to determine whether intervention with erenumab is an effective treatment for PTH attributed to mTBI.

Analgesic Effect of Music Listening During Pain Elicitation in Fibromyalgia

Brief Summary: Patients with fibromyalgia (FM) are more sensitive to things that cause pain. Music lowers self-reported pain in patients with chronic pain. The investigators are able to measure pain sensitivity and pain tolerance using tools that cause pain and give accurate measurements of how much pressure is put on the body (QST). Previous studies have shown that after a few minutes of listening to music patients with FM have less self-reported pain, can get up and move from sitting more quickly, and have more activity in part of the brain that tells the body to stop sending pain signals. The investigators will study 40 patients with FM using the QST tools.

Osteopathic Manipulation Makes a Neuropsychological Difference (BOD)

Brief Summary: Patients with pain commonly experience cognitive impairment. While symptoms of pain are effectively treated with osteopathic manipulative treatment (OMT), the cognitive piece is vastly ignored. Pain-induced cognitive dysfunction can be severe and is particularly apparent in working memory and attention. There is good reason to also expect cognitive responsiveness to OMT. Previous research has already reported related psychiatric outcomes, including relief from stress, self-perception and anxiety, suggesting that OMT may produce more global effects on cortical processing than currently thought.

Pain Medicine Journal
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AAPM

American Academy of Pain Medicine