This section will include pain research in the news, general stories about research and findings, pain abstracts in the news, and PubMed abstracts

Biomarker for Chronic Fatigue Syndrome Identified by Stanford Researchers

People suffering from a debilitating disease known as chronic fatigue syndrome may soon have something they've been seeking for decades: scientific proof of their ailment. Researchers at the Stanford University School of Medicine have created a blood test that can flag the disease, which currently lacks a standard, reliable diagnostic test.

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The Case for Early Physical Therapy

Early use of physical therapy may be a promising non-pharmacologic strategy for patients with musculoskeletal pain. 

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Prehospital Analgesia With Intranasal Ketamine (PAIN-K): A Randomized Double-Blind Trial in Adults

We compare intranasal ketamine with intranasal placebo in providing pain reduction at 30 minutes when added to usual paramedic care with nitrous oxide. Methods: This was a randomized double-blind study of out-of-hospital patients with acute pain who reported a verbal numeric rating scale (VNRS) pain score greater than or equal to 5. Exclusion criteria were younger than 18 years, known ketamine intolerance, nontraumatic chest pain, altered mental status, pregnancy, and nasal occlusion. Patients received usual paramedic care and were randomized to receive either intranasal ketamine or intranasal saline solution at 0.75 mg/kg.

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The Role of Nonpharmacological Approaches to Pain Management: Proceedings of a Workshop

The Forum on Neuroscience and Nervous System Disorders and Global Forum on Innovation in Health Professional Education hosted a public workshop that discussed the state of evidence on the effectiveness of nonpharmacological treatments and integrative health models for pain management, multimodal approaches, and research gaps and key questions for further research. 

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Emotional Mirror Neurons in the Rat's Anterior Cingulate Cortex

How do the emotions of others affect us? The human anterior cingulate cortex (ACC) responds while experiencing pain in the self and witnessing pain in others, but the underlying cellular mechanisms remain poorly understood. Here we show the rat ACC (area 24) contains neurons responding when a rat experiences pain as triggered by a laser and while witnessing another rat receive footshocks. Most of these neurons do not respond to a fear-conditioned sound (CS).
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To Treat Pain Syndrome, Children's Mercy Doctors Try To Change How 'Brain Interprets Signals'

Hospital program offers intensive physical and occupational therapy, relaxation techniques, stress-management training, and music and therapeutic art to help manage Amplified Pain Syndrome.

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Assessing Study Quality and Bias in Prognosis Research on Rehabilitation in Chronic Pain Using the QUIPS Tool

Researchers performed a systematic review to synthesize evidence on prognostic factors for physical functioning after multidisciplinary rehabilitation in patients with chronic musculoskeletal pain and used a tool, QUIPS, which was developed specifically for evaluation of study quality of prognostic studies.

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'Alexa, I’m in pain': Tool Delivers Mindfulness-Based Techniques to Chronic Pain Sufferers

Researchers at Penn State are developing a way to deliver on-demand, guided mindfulness practices via Amazon Alexa to patients experiencing chronic pain. Through their method, a smart assistant will provide Mindfulness-Based Stress Reduction (MBSR) practices to individuals in their homes. 

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Anterior Nucleus of Paraventricular Thalamus Mediates Chronic Mechanical Hyperalgesia

Pain-related diseases are the top leading causes of life disability. Identifying brain regions involved in persistent neuronal changes will provide new insights for developing efficient chronic pain treatment. Here, we showed that anterior nucleus of paraventricular thalamus (PVA) plays an essential role in the development of mechanical hyperalgesia in neuropathic and inflammatory pain models in mice.  

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Why Is Migraine More Common in Women? One Protein May Hold the Key

In research published online April 8 in the Journal of Neuroscience, the calcitonin gene-related peptide (CGRP) is implicated in the development of migraine symptoms caused pain responses in female rodents, but not in males, when introduced into the meninges, the protective tissue layers surrounding the brain. 

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The AAPM Annual Meeting offers education and networking opportunities for all members of the pain care team.

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