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Member Demographics

AAPM members are multidisciplinary pain professionals.

The membership consists of a distinguished community of physicians, researchers, nurse practitioners, psychologists, physical therapists and other allied health professionals with a sustained interest in pain disorders and pain management, from a variety of disciplines and work settings and are involved in basic research, clinical research and treatment, advocacy, and public policy.

AAPM Member Specialties

specialty

AAPM Member Practice Settings

practicesetting

Amgen Novartis

Corporate Relations Council Members

Corporate Relations Council Profiles

The Corporate Relations Council of the American Academy of Pain Medicine partners in seeking new advances in the specialty of pain management and optimum quality of life for pain patients. The Council enables you to connect in a more significant way with the leaders in Pain Management.

Learn how to join this distinguished list of AAPM Corporate Relations Council companies.

CORPORATE PREMIER LEVEL

Amgen
One Amgen Center Drive
Thousand Oaks, CA 91320-1799
www.amgen.com

Our Mission
To improve patient lives and access to treatment through strong mutually beneficial relationships with key patient, professional, and multi-stakeholder organizations, delivering on Amgen’s mission to serve patients.

CORPORATE ELITE ASSOCIATE LEVEL

Helixmith Co., Ltd.
10390 Pacific Center Court
San Diego, CA 92121
www.helixmith.com

Eli Lilly and Company
Lilly Corporate Center
Indianapolis, IN 46285
www.lilly.com

Medtronic
710 Medtronic Parkway
Minneapolis, MN 55432-5604
U.S.A.
www.medtronic.com

At Medtronic, we’re committed to Innovating for Life by pushing the boundaries of medical technology and actually changing the way the world treats chronic disease. Medtronic Neuromodulation provides innovative implantable neurostimulation and drug delivery devices to therapeutically treat intractable pain, as well as other chronic diseases and neurological disorders.

CORPORATE ASSOCIATE LEVEL

Collegium Pharmaceutical, Inc.
780 Dedham Street, Suite 800
Canton, MA 02021
www.collegiumpharma.com

Healthnetics
1220 King Street
Alexandria, VA 22314
www.healthnetics.com

Teva Pharmaceuticals
11100 Nall Avenue
Overland Park, KS 66211
www.tevapharm.com

Teva Pharmaceutical Industries Ltd. is a leading global pharmaceutical company committed to increasing access to high-quality healthcare by developing, producing and marketing affordable medicines. Teva is the world’s largest generic drug maker and has branded businesses focused on CNS, oncology, pain, respiratory and women’s health.

US WorldMeds
4441 Springdale Rd.
Louisville, KY 40241
usworldmeds.com

US WorldMeds is a specialty pharmaceutical company that develops, licenses, and brings to market unique healthcare products designed to improve the lives of patients with challenging conditions and unmet medical needs.

Corporate Relations Council

Reserve your seat on AAPM’s Corporate Relations Council.

The American Academy of Pain Medicine (AAPM) Corporate Relations Council is a distinguished community of healthcare professionals with a sustained interest in pain disorders and pain management.

Partnering with AAPM offers many opportunities to interact with the leading pain physicians and clinicians of the pain management treatment teams. As part of the Council you’ll join a distinguished community of physicians, researchers, and allied health professionals with a sustained interest in pain disorders and pain management. It is designed to:

  • provide a format for establishing and building relationships
  • foster open dialogue among key industry representatives
  • gain greater understanding of the mutual area of interest
  • further programs that promote optimal, cost-effective care for patients affected by pain.

Participation in the AAPM Corporate Relations Council is available to organizations that support the mission and vision of AAPM. Corporate Relations Council companies are profiled on our Corporate Relations Council Members webpage so that AAPM members have the opportunity to learn more about each company.

Download the Corporate Relations Council Brochure to view the variety of benefits.

Join the AAPM Corporate Relations Council

Complete and return this application form or reach out with questions to Josh Karney, Senior Sales Manager–Professional Relations at [email protected].

2017 HOD

Report on the AMA Annual Meeting, June 2017 Chicago

Submitted by Robert Wailes, MD, AAPM AMA Delegate

The annual American Medical Association (AMA) House of Delegates (HOD) meeting convened June 9-14, 2017, in Chicago, IL. I represented the membership and interests of the American Academy of Pain Medicine at this meeting in my capacity as AAPM’s AMA Delegate along with our Alternate Delegate, Donna Bloodworth, MD. Scheduled opportunities to network with other delegates and advocate for Pain Medicine included the Pain and Palliative Medicine Specialty Section Council and meeting, the Neuroscience Caucus, and the Specialty and Services Society meeting. Invitations to attend the meetings of the Texas Delegation (Bloodworth), Pac West Caucus (Wailes), and the PM&R Section Council (Bloodworth) were also accepted.

AAPM Executive Director, Phil Saigh, and Program Manager, Mary Kay Ams, also organized, informed and coordinated AAPM’s participation at the meeting and were invaluable in achieving AAPM’s goals.

Before discussing the June meeting, I would like to suggest all members of the American Academy of Pain Medicine become members of the AMA. Your continued AMA membership is critically important for us to maintain our representation within the House of Delegates. Our role as physicians includes looking at the bigger picture regarding healthcare. It is all of our responsibility to support the advancement of healthcare utilizing “organized medicine” through our specialty, state, and national organizations. The AMA is by far the strongest voice for all physicians on a national basis. It is very important that we maintain our specialty representation within the AMA which requires our AAPM members to also be part of the AMA.

Your AAPM Delegation submitted one resolution to our AMA. It was passed without opposition by the AMA House of Delegates.

The resolution highlights the current challenges to pain management and proposes actions that will positively impact the future treatment of millions of patients suffering from pain. In keeping with the National Pain Strategy, which was released by the Department of Health and Human Services in March 2016, the AAPM resolution clearly documents the tremendous burden that pain – particularly chronic pain – places on the American public. According to a 2011 Institute of Medicine report, approximately 100 million Americans suffer from chronic pain.

The resolution also acknowledges the huge imbalance that exists regarding the attention paid by governmental and regulatory agencies toward the appropriate treatment of chronic pain versus the risks of opioid addiction. Therefore, the Future of Pain Care resolution calls on the AMA to convene a task force to discuss organized medicine’s response to the public health crisis of undertreated and mistreated pain. The task force would bring together the numerous specialties responsible for providing pain care, including primary care and medical and surgical specialties.

A charge of the proposed task force would be to explore and make recommendations for augmenting medical education in order to inform healthcare providers on how to help patients suffering from pain through the use of comprehensive evidence-based pain treatment options (including non-opioid medications for treating pain, alternative treatment modalities and the importance of behavioral health support, physical therapy, etc., along with proper prescribing of opioids among others). For example, ample evidence-based research shows the success of multidisciplinary pain management programs, which typically do not rely heavily on opioids, in treating chronic pain. Furthermore, many mental health techniques for the treatment of pain, such as cognitive behavioral training, meditation, relaxation techniques, biofeedback, self-hypnosis among others, have been shown to be successful in decreasing pain symptoms and reducing the need for opioids.

The task force hopes to address new concepts, such as that of the Anesthesiology Perioperative Surgical Home, which has demonstrated reduction in the burden of post-operative pain and/or acute pain thus resulting in less chronic pain and less need for opioids. Building on these successes, the task force will also discuss strategies that prevent or mitigate acute pain, educate physicians about these strategies and suggest research to study these strategies prevent the development of chronic pain. We hope to start working with the AMA to initiate this task force soon.

Other House actions of specific interest to AAPM members include:

Council on Medical Services Report 4 — Survey of Addiction Treatment Centers’ Availability: This report was the result of a previous AAPM resolution looking to demonstrate the poor availability of addiction treatment centers for many of our members throughout the entire country. The Council decided that it would be too costly to do a national survey and instead suggested AMA members utilize different types of treatment locators that may be available in their community. The main source of national data is SAMHSA’s “behavioral health treatment services locator” (findtreatment.samhsa.gov). It is updated by addiction treatment provider responses to a national survey on substance abuse treatment services and national mental health services survey. The Council did make a recommendation that this locator service provide information regarding the type of insurance providers accept. The Council also made a recommendation to encourage physicians who are authorized to provide medication-assisted treatment (MAT) to be listed publicly in SAMHSA’s treatment locators. It was noted by SAMHSA’s leaders at the meeting that members of their organization only represent 20% of all addiction specialists and very few of them want to be listed publicly because their panel is already full. This demonstrates that it will be an ongoing problem finding good access to addiction services in many of our communities.

Resolution 506 — Expanding Access to Buprenorphine for the Treatment of Opioid Use Disorder: This was amended by the reference committee to include a clause that would remove the mandate for extra certification for this use of the medication. Currently, many of us in the pain field use it off label for pain management but if used for detox then we need to get specific certification. Despite widespread agreement to remove the mandate, it was sent to the Board of Trustees to review and report back at the next meeting.

A significant amount of time was dedicated to the AMA positioning itself and reestablishing policy regarding the future of healthcare policy with the new administration and Congress. There is a great deal of uncertainty regarding expectations for future changes in our healthcare system. There was a generalized consensus that funding for the Medicaid program should not be impossible. The HOD opposed per-capita caps that would weaken this state’s ability to respond to enrollment changes, greater care needs, or breakthrough treatments.

The AMA Wire has excellent coverage of the meeting with the highlights being presented on June 15, 2017. Highlights appear below for your review.

Top 10 stories from the AMA Annual Meeting

June 15, 2017

Hundreds of physicians, medical students, residents, and fellows gathered at the 2017 AMA Annual Meeting in Chicago to consider a wide array of proposals designed to help fulfill the Association’s core mission of promoting medicine and improving public health. These are the top stories from the meeting. Read full coverage at AMA Wire®.

Physicians recognize new psychoactive substances as a health threat
Legal synthetic drugs such as Spice are quickly emerging and difficult to track. The AMA wants new strategies and education on these new drugs of abuse.

Amid high-stakes changes, physicians can light the way
On gun violence, health reform, mega-mergers, practice burdens and more, the AMA is taking a leadership role, says outgoing AMA President Andrew W. Gurman.

Physicians get an inside view of health reform debate at crossroads
Experts on the reform discussion in Washington and value-based medicine offer their insights on the health system’s uncertain future.

New policies target mental health stigma in physicians, students
Delegates address how medical licensing boards handle physicians who have sought behavioral health treatment.

Pain care and opioid-use disorder are the focus of new efforts
While reversing the opioid epidemic remains a vital focus, AMA delegates seek strategies, education to help the millions who live with chronic pain.

New AMA president: Physicians must lead to reshape medicine
Board-certified family physician David O. Barbe, MD, MHA, says the time is right for physician-style leadership that puts patients and professionalism first.

Physicians offer fixes to improve veterans’ access to care
The AMA will continue collaboration with the VA, calls for new funding for the Veterans Choice Program.

AMA takes several actions supporting transgender patients
LGBT-friendly, nondiscriminatory policies land backing from the AMA House of Delegates.

Refugees, detained immigrants deserve access to quality care
Delegates seek better care for detained immigrants. The AMA also votes to keep information in patient records out of immigration officials’ hands.

AMA’s vigor, vision spread across all areas of medicine
The AMA offers critical resources and policies, guides lifelong physician growth and helps improve the nation’s health, says AMA CEO James L. Madara, MD.

Physicians encouraged to take a seat at the table on health care boards
Doctors’ education, expertise and experience warrant greater participation on the boards of health care organizations, says new AMA policy.

Background information about and orientation to the AMA House of Delegates and its meetings:
The HOD is composed of 535 delegates (and slightly fewer alternate delegates) who represent all physician (attending and resident) and medical student members of our AMA. About 60 percent of the delegates represent state associations and about 40 percent represent specialty societies.

Our AMA creates national medical policy through the debate of and adoption of Council reports and of resolutions brought forth by Delegations. The following Councils report at the Annual Meeting: Board of Trustees; Constitution and Bylaws; Ethical and Judicial Affairs; Medical Education; Medical Service; and Science and Public Health.

The President of our AMA is David O. Barbe, MD, MHA, and the President-Elect is Barbara McAneny, MD. Susann R. Bailey, MD, and Bruce A. Scott, MD, remain our AMA’s Speaker and Vice-Speaker, respectively.

If you have any ideas for future resolutions or any suggestions for business at the AMA please contact the AAPM office ([email protected]) or your AAPM delegate or alternate delegate directly:
Bob Wailes ([email protected])
Donna Bloodworth ([email protected])

Respectfully submitted,
Robert Wailes, MD, AAPM AMA Delegate

Learn more about AAPM’s advocacy efforts

2017 HOD Interim

Report from the AMA Interim Meeting
November 2017, Honolulu

Submitted by Robert Wailes, MD, AAPM AMA Delegate

The interim American Medical Association (AMA) House of Delegates (HOD) meeting convened November 10-14, 2017, in Honolulu, HI. I represented the membership and interests of the American Academy of Pain Medicine at this meeting in my capacity as AAPM’s AMA Delegate along with our Alternate Delegate, Donna Bloodworth, MD. Scheduled opportunities to network with other delegates and advocate for Pain Medicine include the Pain and Palliative Medicine Specialty Section Council and meeting, the Neuroscience Caucus, and the Specialty and Services Society meeting. Invitations to attend the meetings of the Texas Delegation (Bloodworth), PacWest Delegation (Wailes), and the PM&R Section Council (Bloodworth) were also accepted. AAPM legal counsel, Jack Bierig complemented AAPM’s participation at the meeting.

Before discussing the November meeting, I would like to suggest all members of the American Academy of Pain Medicine become members of the AMA. Our role as physicians includes looking at the bigger picture regarding healthcare. It is all of our responsibility to support the advancement of healthcare utilizing “organized medicine” through our specialty, state and national organizations. The AMA is by far the strongest voice of all physicians on a national basis. It is very important that we maintain our specialty representation within the AMA which requires our AAPM members to also be part of the AMA.

Your AAPM delegation submitted one resolution to our AMA: Resolution: 005, “Protection of Physician Freedom of Speech.” This resolution was prompted by litigation against three of our former AAPM presidents in a number of jurisdictions. These leaders were named as part of large product liability lawsuits against pharmaceutical companies. The suits claim that the leaders were inappropriately lecturing and providing materials that promoted “irresponsible use of opioids.” It was the opinion of AAPM’s Board of Directors and legal counsel that these claims have no merit and that they will most likely be dismissed from the case at some point in time. The Academy strongly feel that physicians should not be penalized for providing their good faith medical opinions when providing medical education lectures and written materials. Under the direction of the AA PM Board of Directors, we fashioned a resolution that would reassert physicians first amendment rights to express opinions regarding medical issues without fear of recourse or litigation. Furthermore, we asked for the availability of the AMA Litigation Center to review and possibly support in defense of the cases such as this. The Academy felt it was appropriate to ask the AMA Litigation Center to support physician organizations and AMA members who have fallen prey to such litigation schemes. The final language of the resolution’s Resolved clauses was:

RESOLVED, That our American Medical Association strongly oppose litigation challenging the exercise of a physician’s First Amendment right to express good faith opinions regarding medical issues (New HOD Policy); and be it further

RESOLVED, That our AMA’s House of Delegates encourage the AMA Litigation Center to provide such support to a constituent or component medical society whose members have been sued for expressing good faith opinions regarding medical issues as the Litigation Center deems appropriate in any specific case. (New HOD Policy)

After debate, the House felt that the legal issues were too complicated to address at the time and thus voted to defer to the Board of Trustees to take a closer, more detailed look at the issue before coming up with a final decision.

In other related AMA news, the Council on Science and Public Health provided a report on our interim 2016 resolution requesting that neuropathic pain be considered a disease. The suggestion in their report is that this issue be taking up by the AMA Task Force on Pain Care. This task force on pain care was created as a result of an AAPM resolution from the 2017 annual meeting of the House. AMA plans to convene the task force in spring 2018. We hope to have some progress made on defining neuropathic pain as a specific disease state in the near future.

Other House actions of specific interest to AAPM members include:

  • BOT Report 6: Electronically prescribe controlled substances without added processes
    o Adopted by the House of Delegates
  • Resolution 211: Exclusive state control of methadone clinics
    o Referred to the Board of Trustees for decision
  • Resolution 223: Treatment of opioid use disorder in correctional facilities
    o Adopted as amended
  • Resolution 906: Breast feeding in mothers who use opioids
    o Adopted as amended
  • Resolution 909: Expand Naloxone usage
    o Adopted as amended
  • Resolution 915: Easing barriers to medical research on marijuana derivatives
    o Adopted as amended

The AMA Wire has excellent coverage of the meeting with the highlights being presented on November 16, 2017. Highlights appear below for your review.

For more information about the meeting

Top stories from the AMA’s Interim Meeting

November 16, 2017

Hundreds of physicians, medical students, residents, and fellows gathered at the 2017 AMA Interim Meeting in Honolulu to consider a wide array of proposals designed to help fulfill the Association’s core mission of promoting medicine and improving public health. The AMA House of Delegates weighs in on changes to Medicaid, e-prescribing and clerkship spots for U.S. med students. These are the top stories from the meeting. Read full coverage at AMA Wire®.

Actions taken to protect clerkship spots, address bias
There is an increased need for clerkship spots for U.S. medical students. The AMA will call for greater capacity.

Tying HCAHPS to safety-net payment yields unsatisfactory results
The Hospital Consumer Assessment of Healthcare Providers and Systems and other quality assessments should account for social-risk factors.

AMA: Eliminate burdens for controlled substances’ e-prescribing
Delegates also push for effective opioid-use disorder in jails and prisons and emergency naloxone in public settings.

Want to cancel e-prescription? Not always easy; that needs change
E-prescription cancellation should be standardized across EHRs, delegates say. They also push back on EHR-related pay penalties.

Physicians aim to shine light on why drugs cost so much
The AMA will seek to ban unjustified prescription-drug “price gouging” and let pharmacists tell patients when their co-pay exceeds a drug’s cash price.

More Medicaid help sought for Puerto Rico, U.S. Virgin Islands<
The AMA will urge more funding for hurricane-ravaged islands’ Medicaid programs, as well as temporary emergency CMS waivers.

Too much time with TV, Twitter a concern for kids
Newly adopted polices aim to address the adverse effects of excess screen time and social media use among children and teens.

Physicians oppose harmful changes to Medicaid, benefits rules
Delegates stand firm against Medicaid work requirements and changes that would undermine essential health benefits requirements.

More transparency needed on precision medicine coverage
New AMA policy calls for facilitating consistent coverage of genetic medicine and more transparency in how coverage is determined.

When appearing in media, physicians carry special responsibility
Doctors “must uphold the values” of the medical profession. That means providing accurate information, disclosing conflicts of interest, and more.

Former acting U.S. surgeon general earns AMA’s top honor
From ground zero of the Ebola crisis to New York’s ground zero, Boris Lushniak, MD, MPH, served with distinction.

Honor for ally in bid to defend medical staff independence
California Medical Association honors AMA, Litigation Center for aid in lawsuit testing medical staff self-governance. The case awaits resolution.

Beyond chaotic moment, AMA’s CEO foresees innovation’s impact
Making health data more useful will build a better future for patients and physicians, says AMA Executive Vice President and CEO James L. Madara, MD.

Moving medicine forward is a team effort: AMA president
Teamwork among doctors, physician leaders, and other organizations is needed to move medicine in the right direction, says AMA President David O. Barbe, MD, MHA.

Background information about the AMA House of Delegates and its meetings

The HOD is composed of 535 delegates (and slightly fewer alternate delegates) who represent all physician (attending and resident) and medical student members of our AMA. About 60 percent of the delegates represent state associations, and about 40 percent represent specialty societies. The business of Interim meeting in the fall is the consideration of resolutions that deal with “advocacy.” Our AMA defines advocacy as:

“Active use of communication and influence with public and private sector entities responsible for making decisions that directly affect physician practice, payment for physician services, funding and regulation of education and research, and access to and delivery of medical care. Resolutions pertaining to ethics should also be included in the agenda.”

Our AMA creates national medical policy through the debate of and adoption of Council reports and of resolutions brought forth by Delegations. Six Councils report at the Interim Meeting: Constitution and Bylaws, Finance and Governance, Medical Service and Practice, Rules and Credentials, Medical Education, and Legislation.

If you have any ideas for future resolutions or any suggestions for business at the AMA, please contact the AAPM office ([email protected]) or your AAPM delegate or alternate delegate directly:
Bob Wailes ([email protected])
Donna Bloodworth ([email protected])

Respectfully submitted,
Robert Wailes, MD, AAPM AMA Delegate

Learn more about AAPM’s advocacy efforts

2018 HOD

Report on the AMA Annual Meeting
June 2018 Chicago

Submitted by Robert E. Wailes, MD, AAPM AMA Delegate

The annual American Medical Association (AMA) House of Delegates (HOD) meeting convened June 8–13, in Chicago, Illinois. I represented the membership and interests of the American Academy of Pain Medicine at this meeting in my capacity as AAPM’s AMA Delegate along with our Alternate Delegate, Donna M. Bloodworth, MD. Phil Saigh, our AAPM Executive Director, was there to support our efforts as well. Scheduled opportunities to network with other delegates and advocate for pain medicine include the Pain and Palliative Medicine Specialty Section Council and meeting, the Neuroscience Caucus, and the Specialty and Services Society meeting. Additionally, AAPM representatives participated in a number of other meetings, including the Texas Delegation (Bloodworth), PacWest Delegation (Wailes), PM&R Section Council (Bloodworth), and the AMA Executive Vice President’s meeting with medical society CEOS (Saigh).

Before discussing the June meeting, I would like to suggest all members of the American Academy of Pain Medicine become members of the AMA. Our role as physicians includes looking at the bigger picture regarding healthcare. It is our responsibility to support the advancement of healthcare utilizing “organized medicine” through our specialty, state and national organizations. The AMA is by far the strongest voice of all physicians on a national basis. It is very important that we maintain our specialty representation within the AMA which requires our AAPM members to also be part of the AMA.

The annual meeting dealt with many challenging issues and new policies were created. Topics as diverse as gun control and physician aid in dying, as well as many others, kept the meeting very busy. We also had elections for several major positions, including President-Elect. Please see below for more details and a link to the major topics covered at the AMA.

As an update, AAPM passed a resolution calling for the creation of an AMA Task Force on Pain Care at the Annual meeting in June 2017. Progress has been slow, but our AMA is now working to get all of the participants lined up and will soon be scheduling the first meeting. Robert W. Hurley, MD PhD, (who serves on the AAPM Board of Directors) will represent the Academy on the task force. Among the topics the task force will address will be an earlier resolution, also introduced by AAPM, that proposed that “neuropathic pain” be considered a disease. The task force has many other issues to discuss and is aimed at putting the national focus back on great pain care and not just on opioids.

Other House actions of specific interest to AAPM members may include:

Resolution 118: Payment for Advance Care Planning
Reaffirmed policy H-390.916

Resolution 119: Payment for Palliative Care
Reaffirmed policies H-70.915, H-85.951, and H-85.966

Resolution 201: Barriers to Obesity Treatment
Adopted as amended

Resolution 220: Ban on Semi-Automatic Assault Weapons and High-Capacity Ammunition Magazines
Reaffirmed

Resolution 235: Hospital Consolidation
Referred for further study

Resolution 236: Reducing MIPS Reporting Burden
Adopted as amended

Resolution 502: Expedited Prescription CBD Drug Rescheduling
Adopted with a title change

Resolution 524: Naloxone on Commercial Airlines
Adopted

Resolution 525: Tramadol Change from DEA Schedule IV to Schedule III
Not adopted

Report 5: Council on Ethical and Judicial Affairs Report (study aid-in-dying as end-of-life option / the need to distinguish “physician-assisted suicide” from “aid in dying”) Referred (Note: The Reference Committee recommended adoption, but it was referred to the Board of Trustees for further study.)

For more information about the meeting

Top 10 stories from the 2018 AMA Annual Meeting
Jun 14, 2018
AMA Wire
Hundreds of physicians, medical students, residents, and fellows met in Chicago to consider a wide array of proposals to help fulfill the AMA’s core mission of promoting medicine and improving public health.

The HOD is composed of approximately 535 delegates (and slightly fewer alternate delegates) who represent all physician (attending and resident) and medical student members of our AMA. About 60 percent of the delegates represent state associations and about 40 percent represent specialty societies.

Our AMA creates national medical policy through the debate of and adoption of Council reports and of resolutions brought forth by Delegations. If you have any ideas for future resolutions or any suggestions for business at the AMA please contact the AAPM office ([email protected]) or your AAPM delegate or alternate delegate directly:

Bob Wailes ([email protected])
Donna Bloodworth ([email protected])

Respectfully submitted,
Robert Wailes, MD
AAPM AMA Delegate

Learn more about AAPM’s advocacy efforts

AMA House of Delegates

You are represented at the American Medical Association.

AAPM holds a seat in the AMA House of Delegates (HOD) and speaks for its members concerning issues critical to their pain practices. Representation in the HOD is apportioned to medical specialty societies based on the portion of its physician members who also maintains AMA membership. Because you and your peers have joined AMA, your voice is being heard.

If you are not currently one, we encourage you to become an AMA member.

AAPM Representation

AAPM is represented at the HOD by AMA Delegate Robert E. Wailes, MD, and AMA Alternate Delegate Donna M. Bloodworth, MD.

According to Dr. Wailes, “Our role as physicians includes looking at the bigger picture regarding healthcare. It is all of our responsibility to support the advancement of healthcare utilizing organized medicine through our specialty, state and national organizations. The AMA is the strongest voice for physicians on a national basis. It is very important that we maintain our specialty representation within the AMA which requires our AAPM members to also be part of the AMA.”

House of Delegates

The HOD is the principal policy-making body of the American Medical Association. This democratic forum represents the views and interests of a diverse group of member physicians from all 50 state medical associations and more than 120 medical specialty societies. Delegates meet twice per year to establish policies on health, medical, professional and governance matters, as well as the principles within which the AMA’s business activities are conducted.

Be heard.

Consider what issues are important to you and to let your AMA delegates know by contacting them through [email protected]. Dr. Wailes and Dr. Bloodworth would be happy to craft new resolutions to promote our concerns with the House of Delegates.

Reports from Recent House Meetings

Pain Medicine Fellows Scholarship Program

The AAPM Pain Medicine Fellows Scholarship Program fosters the field’s future leaders.

The AAPM Pain Medicine Fellows Scholarship Program scholarship is available to fellows currently in accredited Accreditation Council for Graduate Medical Education (ACGME) or American Osteopathic Association (AOA) pain medicine fellowship programs. Scholarships offset the expense to attend the AAPM Annual Meeting.

The Academy is pleased to offer scholarship recipients, who are future leaders in the pain medicine field, the opportunity to engage with current thought leaders and researchers. The number of scholarships awarded will be determined by available funding.

Honoring Scholarship Recipients

Scholarships include:

  • Registration to the Annual Meeting.
  • A free year of AAPM membership.
  • Up to $1,000 in reimbursement for related costs to attend the meeting. Reimbursable expenses will be limited to travel (i.e., air, ground, baggage costs, and travel-related tips), and hotel (excluding incidental costs). Meals are not reimbursable. The Fellow will be responsible for any expenses incurred above the $1,000 allowable costs specified above.
  • Networking opportunities with leaders in the field of pain medicine at both a reception for program directors and fellows, as well as other networking opportunities throughout the meeting.

Questions? Please email [email protected] or call AAPM Member Services at 847-375-4731.

Previous Pain Medicine Fellows Scholarship Recipients

2019

Bonita Franklin, DO, Louisiana State University, New Orleans, LA

Aaron Heller, DO MS, Cleveland Clinic Foundation, Cleveland, OH

Saba Javed, MD, MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, TX

Andrew Joyce, MD, Oregon Health & Science University, Portland, OR

Ashwin Rangavajjula, MD, Emory University Hospital, Atlanta, GA

Loc Thang, MD PhD, Washington University, St. Louis, MO

2018

Rajiv Reddy, MD, UCSD Health Center, La Jolla, CA

Saiyun Hou, MD, PhD, The University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, TX

Anuj Aggarwal, MD, Stanford University, School of Medicine, Stanford, CA

2017

Emanuel Narcis Husu, MD, University of Minnesota, Minneapolis, MN

Erika L. Moody, MD, University of Texas Health Science Center, San Antonio, TX

Nafisseh Warner, MD, ScM, Mayo Clinic, Rochester, MN

2016

Lucien Alexandre MD PhD, Beth Israel Deaconess Medical Center, Brookline, MA

Khurram J. Khan MD, University of Southern California, Los Angeles, CA

Jaymin Patel MD, University of Pittsburgh Medical Center, Pittsburgh, PA

Douglas Schechter, MD, New York University, New York, NY

Kenneth Tseng MD, Massachusetts General Hospital, Boston, MA

2015

John D. Allen, DO, Naval Medical Center, Portsmouth, VA

Charles E. Bryant, MD, San Antonio Military Medical Center, Fort Sam Houston, TX

David K. Bui, MD, University of California, San Diego, La Jolla, CA

Scott A. Burlison, MD, University of Texas Medical Branch-Galveston, Galveston, TX

George C. Chang Chien, DO, Cleveland Clinic Foundation, Cleveland, OH

Arif A. Khan, MD, New York University, New York, NY

Sean M. Moore, MD, University of Washington, Seattle, WA

Paragi H. Rana, MD, Beth Israel Deaconess Medical Center, Brookline, MA

William D. Ross, MD, Medical College of Wisconsin, Milwaukee, WI

Najmeh P. Sadoughi, MD, University of Southern California, Los Angeles, CA

Jose Ramil O. Santos, MD, University of Washington, Seattle, WA

Daniel Vardeh, MD, Brigham and Women’s Hospital, Boston, MA

Sophy C. Zheng, MD, Beth Israel Deaconess Medical Center, Brookline, MA

Presidential Commendations

AAPM Presidential Commendation Honorees

Each year, the AAPM President may choose to honor additional worthy individuals with a Presidential Commendation.

2020 Presidential Commendations:

  • Jianguo Cheng, MD PhD; Halena Gazelka, MD; Rollin Gallagher, MD MPH
    In recognition and appreciation of their work on the HHS Pain Management Best Practices Inter-Agency Task Force.

  • Robert Hurley, MD PhD
    In recognition and appreciation of his advocacy work in representing AAPM on the AMA Pain Care Task Force.

  • Patrick Tighe, MD MS; Steven Cohen, MD
    In recognition and appreciation of their efforts serving not one, but 2 years, as AAPM Annual Meeting Co-Chairs.

  • B. Todd Sitzman, MD MPH
    In recognition and appreciation of his commitment to excellence in patient care and advocacy and his career-long service to the field: Past President of AAPM, Past President of NANS and his service on multiple editorial boards just to name a few.

See all AAPM awards

Pain Medicine Fellowship Excellence Award

The American Academy of Pain Medicine’s Pain Medicine Fellowship Excellence Award

The Pain Medicine Fellowship Excellence Award recognizes pain medicine fellowship programs within the United States that are accredited by the Accreditation Council for Graduate Medical Education (ACGME), and provide an exceptional learning experience to their fellows, preparing them to deliver the highest standard of care to patients with pain.

Award Criteria & Eligibility

The award is intended to recognize programs whose efforts coincide with AAPM’s mission “to advance and promote the full spectrum of multidisciplinary pain care, education, advocacy, and research to improve function and quality of life for people in pain.”

Pain medicine fellowship programs within the United States, accredited by ACGME, that meet the following award criteria are encouraged to apply:

  1. Exemplify educational excellence, including, but not limited to:
    • High-quality, comprehensive and interdisciplinary training in both acute and chronic pain, including its evaluation, treatment and management.
    • Development of research opportunities that target fellows’ goals and needs.
    • Receiving feedback on fellows’ performance.
  2. Demonstrate a commitment to providing evidence-based, safe, and patient-centered care.
  3. Facilitate the most rewarding fellowship experience to trainees, including (but not limited to) work-life balance and opportunities to pursue interests and accomplish their professional goals.

Past recipients are eligible to reapply five years after receiving the award.

Application Process

The 2021 award application is expected to open in Fall 2020. Pain Medicine Fellowship Programs will be notified when the 2021 application process opens.

Past Recipients

2020: Multidisciplinary Pain Medicine Fellowship Program of the University of Chicago Medical Center

2019: University of California San Diego Pain Medicine Fellowship Program

2018: Johns Hopkins Pain Medicine Fellowship Program; NYU Langone Health Pain Medicine Fellowship Program

2017: Stanford Pain Medicine Fellowship Program

2016: Cleveland Clinic; Medical College of Wisconsin; University of California, Davis; University of Pittsburgh Medical Center

2015: Beth Israel Deaconess Medical Center, Brookline, MA; Mayo Clinic, Rochester, MN

2014: Jackson Memorial Hospital/University of Miami (JMH/UM), Miami, FL

2013: Brigham and Women’s Hospital, Boston, MA

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AAPM

American Academy of Pain Medicine