Outcomes of Sympathetic Blocks in the Management of Complex Regional Pain Syndrome: A Retrospective Cohort Study

Background: Sympathetic dysfunction may be present in complex regional pain syndrome, and sympathetic blocks are routinely performed in practice. To investigate the therapeutic and predictive values of sympathetic blocks, the authors test the hypotheses that sympathetic blocks provide analgesic effects that may be associated with the temperature differences between the two extremities before and after the blocks and that the effects of sympathetic blocks may predict the success (defined as achieving more than 50% pain reduction) of spinal cord stimulation trials.  

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Transfer of Complex Regional Pain Syndrome to Mice via Human Autoantibodies is Mediated by Interleukin-1–Induced Mechanisms.

 Complex regional pain syndrome (CRPS) is a poorly understood painful condition, which typically arises after distal limb trauma; 20% of patients may develop lifelong severe incessant pain with few therapeutic options. In this study, we show that immunoglobulin G autoantibodies from patients with severe, persistent CRPS, on transfer to hind paw-injured mice, elicit important features of the clinical condition and profound glial activation in pain-related brain regions. Blockade of the proinflammatory cytokine interleukin-1 (IL-1) both prevents and reverses these changes. Our findings suggest that antibody-mediated autoimmunity contributes to the development of severe CRPS after injury and that blockade of IL-1 actions may be an attractive therapeutic prospect. Investigation of autoantibody contribution to other unexplained chronic pain syndromes seems warranted.
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Trialing of ISS in Patients With CRPS

Brief Summary: This is a multi-center, prospective, open-label, single-arm, observational, feasibility study. The goal of this study is to determine the feasibility of intra-spinal stimulation with optimal paresthesia coverage therapy for chronic pain relief in patients with complex regional pain syndrome type I or causalgia. Up to 20 patients with intractable chronic severe limb pain associated with complex regional pain syndrome (CRPS) will be included in the study. A standard of care trial phase to test a subjects' response to Intraspinal-Optimal Stim therapy will be conducted during a 3 to 10-day period. Patients that obtain 50% or greater pain relief during the trial period will undergo permanent implantation of the device. Primary outcome will evaluate pain response at 3 months of therapy, based on NPRS pain score relative to baseline. Patients will be followed up for 6 months after the start of therapy.

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2019 AAPM Meeting Highlights from Practical Pain Management

Read articles about the latest pain research present at AAPM35 in Denver, March 6-10, 2019. 

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