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June 21, 2019

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AMA House of Delegates Annual Meeting Update

Pain medicine was represented at the recent American Medical Association House of Delegates (HOD) Annual Meeting by AAPM delegate Robert Wailes, MD, and alternate delegate Donna Bloodworth, MD. Among topics discussed, delegates advocated for patient’s drug addiction treatment records to be easily accessed for physicians.

Read more about the meeting:

New AAPM SIG: Academic Pain Medicine

AAPM recently created a new Academic Pain Medicine Shared Interest Group. This SIG is dedicated to supporting academic pain medicine through:

  • Deliberate mentorship of academic pain clinicians, under the rubric of faculty development
  • Programmatic and ongoing career development of pain medicine researchers, educators, and academic leaders throughout their careers
  • The organization of an outstanding academic meeting session at the AAPM Annual Meeting with targeted provision of networking opportunities to academic pain medicine clinicians. AAPM members can join the SIG by updating their account preferences on the My Account and click Shared Interest Groups under the Membership and Participation tab.

Transfer of Complex Regional Pain Syndrome to Mice via Human Autoantibodies is Mediated by Interleukin-1–Induced Mechanisms.

 Complex regional pain syndrome (CRPS) is a poorly understood painful condition, which typically arises after distal limb trauma; 20% of patients may develop lifelong severe incessant pain with few therapeutic options. In this study, we show that immunoglobulin G autoantibodies from patients with severe, persistent CRPS, on transfer to hind paw-injured mice, elicit important features of the clinical condition and profound glial activation in pain-related brain regions. Blockade of the proinflammatory cytokine interleukin-1 (IL-1) both prevents and reverses these changes. Our findings suggest that antibody-mediated autoimmunity contributes to the development of severe CRPS after injury and that blockade of IL-1 actions may be an attractive therapeutic prospect. Investigation of autoantibody contribution to other unexplained chronic pain syndromes seems warranted.

Association Between Medical Cannabis Laws and Opioid Overdose Mortality has Reversed Over Time

​Medical cannabis has been touted as a solution to the US opioid overdose crisis since Bachhuber et al. [M. A. Bachhuber, B. Saloner, C. O. Cunningham, C. L. Barry, JAMA Intern. Med. 174, 1668–1673] found that from 1999 to 2010 states with medical cannabis laws experienced slower increases in opioid analgesic overdose mortality. That research received substantial attention in the scientific literature and popular press and served as a talking point for the cannabis industry and its advocates, despite caveats from the authors and others to exercise caution when using ecological correlations to draw causal, individual-level conclusions.

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AAPM

American Academy of Pain Medicine